Undergraduate Curriculum

Course number : AGRON 1101

Course title : Fundamentals of Agronomy-Theory (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Agronomy is the art and underlying science in production and improvement of field crops with the efficient use of soil fertility, water, labour, machinery and other factors related to field crop production. Therefore, understanding the elementary principles and practices of field crop production and management of farm resources and inputs are crucial for an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• introduce the concepts of agronomy and crop suitability in relation to agro-climate and agro-ecology
• provide knowledge on field crop classification and cropping practices
• make understand about the functions, sources and management of plant nutrients
• impart knowledge on cultural and intercultural operations of field crops

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• understand the concepts of agronomy
• justify crop suitability based on different agro-climatic and geographical condition
• categorize crops and describe cropping practices
• state the functions, sources and management of plant nutrients
• describe the cultural and intercultural operations of field crops

Course Content
An Introduction to Agronomy: Concept, importance, scope and basic principles. Evolution of modern crop agriculture.
Agrometeorology: Concept, weather and climate elements. Cropping seasons of Bangladesh and their characteristics. Rainfall and temperature pattern in Bangladesh and their influence on crop distribution.
Crops and Cropping: Agronomic classification of crops. Concept of cropping patterns, crop rotation and mono and multiple cropping.
Crop Geography: Distribution of crops in relation to climate and soil in world perspective. Agroecological zones of Bangladesh – their characteristics and crop suitability.
Tillage: Concept, objectives and types of tillage. Advantages and disadvantages of different types of tillage. Effect of tillage on soil characteristics and nutrient availability. Determinants of time, depth and number of ploughing. Characteristics of ideal tilth.
Crop Nutrition: Essential elements, their sources and forms of absorption. Function, deficiency symptoms and toxic effects of nutrient elements in crop plants. Manures and fertilizers, definition, characteristics, classification and nutrient contents. Preparation and preservation of manures. Methods of application of manures and fertilizers; their advantages and disadvantages. Soil fertility and productivity. Maintenance of soil productivity through agronomic manipulation.
Planting Practices: Concept, types of planting materials, planting methods, depth and density and their determinants. Field conditions for sowing.
Intercultural Practices: Mulching, thinning, weeding, gap filling, earthing up – their concepts and objectives.
Irrigation and Drainage: Concept, methods, advantages and disadvantages.


Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Question and answering
• Tutorial

Assessment Strategy
• MCQ
• Quiz
• Short question
• Essay type question
• Assignment


Books Recommended
Balasubramaniyan, P. and Palaniappan, S. P. 2009. Principles and Practices of Agronomy. Second Edition. Agrobios, India.
Bhuiya, M. S. U., Islam, M. M., Uddin, M. R., Salam, M. A. and Rahman, M. M. 2009. Introductory Agronomy. Oracle Publications, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Das, P.C. 1997. Manures and Fertilizers, Kalyani Publishers. Ludhiana, New Delhi, Calcutta. 130p.
De, G.C. 1995. Fundamentals of Agronomy. Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, Calcutta. 429p.
Morachan, Y.B. 1993. Crop Production and Management. 2nd Edition (Reprint). Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, Bombay, Calcutta. 294p.
Reddy, T. Y. and Reddi, G. H. S. 2008. Principles of Agronomy. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana, New Delhi, Hyderabad, Kolkata, India.
Singh, S.S. 1996. Principles and Practices of Agronomy. 3rd Edition (Reprint). Kalyani Publishers. New Delhi.

 

 

Course number : AGRON 1102
Course title : Introductory Agronomic Practices-Practical (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Agronomy is the art and underlying science in production and improvement of field crops with the efficient use of soil fertility, water, labour, machinery and other factors related to crop production. Therefore, familiarizing with different inputs and farm machineries, and practicing cultural operations of crop production are crucial for an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• introduce the students with different field crops and their growth phases
• demonstrate the fertilizer and manure applications and composting methods
• identify different manures and fertilizers, soil and meteorological instruments
• show different agricultural implements and demonstrate their operations for calculating efficiencies
• identify deficiency symptoms of plant nutrients and calculate manure and fertilizer requirements for crops

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• identify different field crops, soil, manures and fertilizers, farm implements and meteorological instruments
• familiarize with fertilizer and manure applications and composting methods
• operate common farm implements and calculate their efficiencies
• recognize deficiency symptoms of plant nutrients
• calculate manure and fertilizer requirements for crops
identify different growth phases and performed intercultural operations of a crop raised by themselves

Course Content
• Identification of field crops
• Study of different farm implements (a) identification, (b) practicing of different operations and (c) determination of their efficiency
• Identification of soil by finger feel method
• Identification of manures, fertilizers and studying their physical characteristics
• Computation of manures and fertilizers for different crops
• Preparation and preservation of compost / farm yard manure
• Practicing different methods of application of manures and fertilizers
• Raising a crop and studying its different growth phases
• Practicing weeding, thinning, gap-filling, mulching and earthing up
• Study on effect of plant nutrients – N, P, K on root and shoot growth and yield of a cereal crop in pot culture
• Study of different meteorological instruments
• Study of climatic pattern of Bangladesh

Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Demonstration
• Lab work
• Field visit
• Field work
• Problem solving
• Assignment

Assessment Strategy
• Sample identification
• Illustration
• Oral examination
• Exercise

Books Recommended
Mavi, H.S. 1974. Introduction to Agro-meteorology. Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi.
Simpson, K. 1986. Fertilizers and Manures. Longman Groups Limited. Hong Kong.
Bhattacharya, B. 2008. Advanced Principles and Practices of Agronomy. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.

 

 

 


Course number : AGRON 1201
Course title : Seed Science and Technology-Theory (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Seed is the basic input of agriculture and quality seed is of prime importance for higher crop productivity. Therefore, understanding of seed, their development, quality improvement, production and storage is vital for an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• give the students a basic idea about seeds and features of seed quality
• illustrate quality seed production techniques
• provide knowledge about seed rate, storage and treatment
• make the student understand the concept of seed germination, vigour and dormancy
• impart knowledge about seed certification and marketing systems in Bangladesh

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• gain the basic concept of seeds and seed quality attributes
• interpret the seed crop production techniques
• explain seed rate, storage conditions and treatment techniques
• describe seed germination, vigour and dormancy
• familiarize with seed certification and marketing systems in Bangladesh

Course Content
Introduction to Seed: Definition, importance, classification and structure, formation and development of seed.
Seed Quality: Attributes of quality seed. Importance of quality seed. Importance of quality seed in crop production. Factors affecting seed quality during production and processing.
Seed Germination and Vigour: Definition and process of germination, Conditions necessary for germination. Concept of seed viability and vigour. Significance of seed vigour in crop production.
Seed Dormancy: Definition, kinds and causes. Importance of dormancy in crop production. Means of breaking seed dormancy.
Seed Rate: Concept, planting value of seed. Factors affecting seed rate.
Seed Crop Cultivation: Basic principles, methods of cultivation and harvesting of seed crop. Processing and grading of seed.
Principles of Seed Storage: Environmental factors affecting seed in storage. Types of storage facilities for seed. Safe conditions for seed storage. Factors affecting seed longevity deterioration. The processes involved in seed deterioration.
Seed Treatment: Objectives and procedures. Seed treating chemicals.
Seed Testing: Definition and objectives. Seed sampling. Testing of seeds for moisture, purity, germination, viability and vigour.
Quality Control of Seed: Definition and objectives. Seed certification procedure. Role of National Seed Board. Seed Certification Agency in the quality control of seed. Present status of production and supply of seed in Bangladesh.

Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Question and answering
• Tutorial
Assessment Strategy
• MCQ
• Quiz
• Short question
• Essay type question
• Assignment

Books Recommended
Agrawal, R. L. 2009. Seed Technology. Second Edition, Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, India.
Basra, A.S. (ed.). 1995. Seed Quality: Basic Mechanisms and Agricultural Implications. Food Product Press, New York.
Basra, A.S. (Ed). 2006. Handbook of Seed Technology. Haworth Press New York, USA.
Bewley, J.D. and Black, M. 1994. Seed Physiology of Development and Germination. 2nd Edition, Springer-Verlag. London.
Copeland, L. O. and McDonald, M. B. 1995. Seed Science and Technology. 3rd Edition, Chapman & Hall, New York.
Copeland L.O. and McDonald, M.F. 2001. Principles of Seed Science and Technology – 4th Ed. Burgess Pub. Co., USA
Joshi, A. K. and Singh, B. D. 2005. Seed Science and Technology. Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi, India.

 

 


Course number : AGRON 1202
Course title : Seed Science and Technology-Practical (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Seed is the basic input of agriculture and quality seed is of prime importance for higher crop productivity. Therefore, practical knowledge about seed structure, quality control, treatment and production is vital for an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• enable the students to identify and classify seeds of different field crops
• demonstrate different seed structures
• exhibit different seed sampling techniques
• enable the student to perform the different seed quality tests
• teach the students calculating seed rate of different crops
• show seed crop cultivation technique

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• identify and classify seeds of different field crops
• familiarize with different seed structures
• perform different seed sampling techniques
• test seeds for different quality attributes
• calculate seed rate of different crops
• raise seed crops

Course Content
• Identification of seed and preparation of seed album
• Study of structures of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous seeds
• Techniques of seed sampling
• Moisture test of seed
• Purity test of seed
• Germination test of seed
• Viability test of seed
• Vigour test of seed
• Calculation of seed rate of crops
• Practicing seed grading
• Practicing seed treatment
• Growing seed crop in students’ individual plots/pots

Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Demonstration
• Lab work
• Field visit

Assessment Strategy
• Sample identification
• Illustration
• Exercise
• Oral examination

Books Recommended
Hampton, J.G. and Tekrony, D.M. (eds.). 1995. Handbook of Vigour Test Methods. 3rd Edition. International Seed Testing Association, Zurich, Switzerland.
ISTA. 1999. International Rules for Seed Testing. 1999. Supplement to Seed Science and Technology. Vol. 27. pp. 27-32.
Nema, N. P. 1989. Principles of Seed Certification and Testing. Allied Publishers Limited. Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Bombay, Calcutta, Hyderabad, Lucknow, Madras, New Delhi, India.
Sen, S. and Ghosh, N. 2008. Seed Science and Technology. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana, New Delhi, Hyderabad, Kolkata, India.

 

 


Course number : AGRON 2101
Course title : Weed Science- Theory (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Weed is the most deleterious crop pest which alone causes yield losses more than the combined losses of other pests. Therefore, understanding basic knowledge on weeds, their effect on crops and their management are vital for an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• provide knowledge about concept of weeds, their characteristics, types and impact on agriculture
• explain weed distribution, persistence and survival mechanisms
• make the students understand different dimensions of crop-weed competition
• elucidate different weed management practices
• provide knowledge on eco-friendly weed management options in agriculture

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• familiarize with the concept of weeds, their characteristics, types and impact on agriculture
• understand weed distribution, persistence and survival mechanisms
• describe different dimensions of crop-weed competition
• explain different weed management practices
• judge the impact of chemical weed control on crop, weed and environment

Course Content
Introduction to Weed: Definition, characteristics and classification. Agricultural and non-agricultural losses caused by weeds. Positive value of weed, brief account of the common weeds of Bangladesh with emphasis on the biology of major weeds.
Survival Mechanism of Weed: Propagation, dispersal and persistence.
Distribution of Weeds: Weed distribution in relation to soil, season, land topography, crop and crop production practices.
Crop-Weed Competition: Concept, critical period of seed competition and factors affecting crop-weed competition, competitive ability of weeds and the factors affecting it. Allelopathic effects of weeds on crops and vice-versa.
Weed Management: Concept and principle of integrated weed management. Weed eradication. Cultural, biological and herbicidal methods of weed control- their advantages and disadvantages. Classification, formulation and mode of action of herbicide. Methods of herbicide application. Factors affecting the foliage and soil applied herbicides. Herbicide selectivity and factors affecting it. Herbicidal weed control in major crops viz. rice, jute, wheat, cotton and sugarcane. Toxic symptoms of herbicides in weeds and crops. Effects of herbicides on environment.
Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Question and answering
• Tutorial

Assessment Strategy
• MCQ
• Short question
• Essay type question
• Assignment

Books Recommended
Aldrish, R.J. 1984. Weed-crop ecology- Principles in Weed Management. Breton Publishers, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
Alteri, M.A. and Liebman, M. 1988. Weed Management in Agroecosystem: Ecological Approaches, CRC Press, Inc. Boca Raton Florida, U.S.A.
Anderson, W.P. 2007. Weed Science: Principles and Applications. 4th edition. Waveland PR Inc.
Rao, V. S. 2000. Principles of Weed Science. Second Edition. Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, Calcutta, India.
Rice, E. L. 2012. Allelopathy. 2nd Edition. Academic Press. USA. eBook. ISBN: 9780080925394. ESBN: 9780125870559
Ross, M. A. and Lembi, C.A. 2009. Applied Weed Science: Including the Ecology and Management of Invasive Plants. 3rd Edition. Prentice Hall, USA
Zimdahl, R.L. 1980. Weed-crop competition- a review. International Plant Protection Centre, Oregon State University, Comallis, Oregon, U.S.A.

 

 

 

Course number : AGRON 2102
Course title : Weed Science-Practical (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Weed is the most detrimental integral part of crop production system. Therefore, understanding different practical aspects of weeds and their management are important for an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• enable the students to identify major weeds, their morphology and propagation
• explain the life cycle of major weeds and teach preparing weed herbarium
• enable the students to identify and characterize different herbicides
• teach the students calculation of herbicide doses for crops
• demonstrate sprayer calibration technique
• provide knowledge regarding weed survey method

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• identify and classify weeds and their propagules
• understand the life cycle of major weeds
• prepare weed herbarium
• identify and characterize different herbicides
• calculate the herbicide doses for crops
• calibrate sprayers for herbicide application
• perform weed survey

Course Content
• Identification of weeds and weed seeds/propagules
• Preparation of weed herbarium
• Study of life cycle and morphology of major weeds- (a) grass, (b) sedge and (c) broadleaf weeds
• Study on identification of herbicides and study of their physical characteristics
• Calibration of a sprayer
• Herbicide calculation
• Spraying of non-selective, pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides in crop field to study their effect on crop and weed
• Weed survey in major crops of BAU farm and determination of importance value of weeds

Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Demonstration
• Lab work
• Field visit
• Field work
• Assignment
• Group discussion

Assessment Strategy
• Sample identification
• Illustration
• Exercise
• Oral examination
• Presentation

Books Recommended
Griffiths, W. 1990. Weed Guide. Published by Schenring Agriculture, Nottingham Road, Stapleford, Nottingham NG98AG, UK.
Hill, T.A. 1977. The biology of weeds. Studies in Biology. No. 79, Edward Arnold, London.
Holm, L.G.; Doll, J.; Holm, E.; Pancho, J. and Herberger, J.P. 1977. The Worlds Weeds: Distribution and Biology. University Press of Hawaii, Honolulu.
Monta, H. 1997. Handbook of Arable weeds in Japan- For correct identification. Published by Kumiai Chemical Industry Co. Ltd., Taitoh-ku, Tokyo 110, Japan.
Zimdahl, R. 2008. Fundamentals of Weed Science. Third edition. Academic Press, USA.

 

 


Course number : AGRON 3201
Course title : Crop Husbandry- Theory (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 3
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Understanding the influence of crop growth factors and different management practices on field crop productivity is very essential for successful crop production. Therefore, familiarizing with crop growth factors, agronomic management, production and post-harvest technology and economics of field crop production are important for an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• provide knowledge on different factors that affect growth, development and yield of field crops
• make the student familiar with different aspects of water, fertilizer and organic matter management during crop production
• help the students getting an in-depth knowledge on managing different stresses that affect growth, development, yield and quality of field crops
• enhance students’ knowledge on crop production, post-harvest processing technology and computation of production cost of cereal, pulse, sugar, narcotic and green manuring crops
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• understand the role of different factors on growth, development and yield of field crops
• describe the management aspects of water, fertilizer and organic matter during crop production
• manage different stresses that affect growth, development, yield and quality of field crops
• state the production technology and post-harvest processing of cereal, pulse, sugar, narcotic and green manuring crops
• elucidate the production cost of cereal, pulse, sugar, narcotic and green manuring crops
Course Content
Crop Growth Factors: Factors affecting growth, development and yield of crops.
Water Management: Water use efficiency under irrigated farming. Water management in dry land farming. Irrigation scheduling.
Fertilizer Management: Balanced fertilization. Fertilizer management in relation to varietal characteristics, growth phases, cropping systems and irrigation.
Organic Matter Management: Maintenance and replenishment of organic matter in soil. Concept of organic farming.
Management of Stress: Moisture, drought and flood, cold, heat, salinity and alkalinity stress and their management for crop production.
Production Technology of Crops: Origin, climate and soil requirements, characteristics of species and cultivars, cultivation practices, post-harvest operations and cost of production of the following crops:
Cereal crops: Rice, wheat, maize, barley and millets.
Sugar crops: Sugarcane and sugarbeet.
Pulse crops: Lentil, mungbean, grasspea, pea, chickpea, pigeonpea and blackgram.
Narcotic crops: Tobacco.
Green manuring crops: Dhaincha, sunnhemp and cowpea.

Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Question and answering
• Tutorials

Assessment Strategy
• MCQ
• Short question
• Essay type question
• Assignment


Books Recommended
Ancha Srinivasan. 2006. Handbook of Precision Agriculture – Principles and Applications. Food Product Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc. New York.
Gupta, U.S. 2005. Physiology of Stressed Crops: nutrient relations. Science Pub., India.
Martin, J.H., Waldren, R.P. and Stamp D.L. 2006. Principles of Field Crop Production, 4th Ed., the MacMillan Co., New York.
Reddy, S. R. 2006. Agronomy of Field Crops. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana, New Delhi, Hyderabad, Kolkata, India.
Singh, S. S. 2003. Crop Management under Irrigated and Rainfed Conditions. Kalyani Publishers, Ludhiana, New Delhi, Hyderabad, Kolkata, India.
Taize, L., E. Zeiger. 2006. Plant Physiology. Sinauer Pub. U.S.A.
Thakur, C. 1979. Scientific Crop Production. Volume 1 and II. 3rd Edition. Metropolitan Book Co. Ltd. 1, Netaji Subhash Marg, New Delhi 11002, India.

 

 

Course number : AGRON 3202
Course title : Crop Husbandry- Practical (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Familiarization with the practical aspects of production and management practices of field crop, and computation of production cost is very essential for an agriculture graduate. This course is therefore designed to offer practical experiences on different aspects of field crop production, their management and economics.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• familiarize the students with procedures of conducting experiments on the effects of plant density
• make student understand about the techniques of ideal nursery bed preparation for raising seedlings
• demonstrate sugarcane cultivation techniques
• show the students how the green manuring crop is grown and incorporated into the soil
• prepare irrigation schedule for field crops
• teach the students calculating production cost of cereal, pulse, sugar, narcotic and green manuring crops

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• understand the procedure of conducting experiments on plant density
• prepare and manage ideal nursery bed
• perform different sugarcane plantation methods
• describe green manuring crop production technology and its incorporation techniques
• prepare irrigation schedule for field crops
• calculate cost of production of cereal, pulse, sugar, narcotic and green manuring crops

Course Content
• Study of plant density on the growth and yield of a crop grown in students’ plot
• Preparation of nurseries for raising seedlings of rice and tobacco.
• Practising different methods of planting sugarcane
• Practising irrigation scheduling for a crop
• Raising a green manure crop and its incorporation in the soil
• Evaluation of the effect of different moisture stresses on the growth and yield of a crop grown in pot
• Computation of production cost of crops included in Course No. Agron. 3201

Teaching Strategy/ Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Demonstration
• Field visit
• Field work
• Problem solving
• Assignment

Assessment Strategy
• Illustration
• Oral examination
• Exercise

Books Recommended
Micheal, M. A. 2003. Irrigation Theory and Practices. Vikas Pub. House,New Delhi, India.
Misra, R. D. and Ahmed, M. 1993. Manual on Irrigation Agronomy. Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, India
Pessaraskli, M. A. 2000. A. Hand Book of Stress Physiology, Marker and Deekar.
Kipps, M.S. 1978. Production of Field Crops. 6th Edition. Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd. New Delhi, India.
Mudaliar, V. I.S. 1984. Principles of Agronomy. 5th Edition. The Bangalore Printing and Publishing Co., Ltd. Mysore Road, Bangalore18, India.
Yawalkar, K.S., Agarwal, J.P. and Bokde, S. 1981. Manures and Fertilizers. Agri-Horticulture Publication House, Nagpur-440010, India.

 

 


Course number : AGRON 4201
Course title : Crop Production and Farm Management-Theory (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 3
Total Marks : 100


Rationale
Agro-ecosystem, cropping systems, farm planning and management are very important for the production of industrial crop and their quality improvement. Therefore, understanding of agro-ecosystems, cropping practices, land use pattern, farm management and technologies related to production and quality improvement of crops having industrial value are very essential for an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• offer information on production technology of quality improvement of industrial crops
• provide knowledge on planning and management of agricultural farm
• make students familiar with land use systems and crop statistics of Bangladesh
• impart knowledge on agro-ecosystems and cropping systems of Bangladesh

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• understand the production technology of quality improvement of industrial crops
• describe the planning and management of agricultural farm
• familiarize with the land use systems and crop statistics of Bangladesh
• explain the agro-ecosystems and cropping systems of Bangladesh

Course Content
Production Technology of Crops: Origin, climate and soil requirements, characteristics of species and cultivars, cultivation practices, post-harvest operations and cost of production of the following crops:
Fibre Crops: Jute, cotton, sunnhemp and kenaf.
Oil Crops: Mustard, sesame, groundnut, soybean, linseed, sunflower, safflower and castor.
Beverage Crops: Tea, coffee.
Forage Crops: Maize, sorghum, grasspea, cowpea, naiper grass and guineagrass

Quality Control of Crops: Factors affecting the quality of crops. Agronomic means of improving quality of crops.
Land use and Crop Statistics in Bangladesh: Categories of land use system, area, production, and yield of crops of Bangladesh over time.
Farm Planning and Management: Factors to be considered for the establishment of a farm. Farm layout and farm budgeting. Farm record keeping. Principles of selection of farm enterprises.
Cropping Scheme: Utility and principles of preparation.
Agro-ecosystem: Concept, system properties, determinants, types, resources, characteristics of farming systems of Bangladesh.
Cropping Systems: Concept and determinants:
Multiple cropping: Objective, types, advantages and disadvantages.
Crop rotation: Planning of crop rotation.
Crop diversification: Concept, importance, present status and future strategy in Bangladesh.
Crop intensification: Concept, importance and limitations.
Cropping patterns of Bangladesh and possibilities of their improvement.
Crop Calendar: Objectives, utility, procedure of preparation.
Crop Evaluation: Crop yield estimation, crop cutting experiment, crop reporting and crop forecasting.

Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Question and answering

Assessment Strategy
• Written test
• Quiz
• Assignment
• Presentation

Books Recommended
Beneke, R.R. 1955. Managing the Farm Business. John Wiley and Sons. Inc. New York, London.
Chatterjee, B.N., Maiti, S. and Mandal, B.K. 1989. Cropping Systems (Theory and Practice) Second Ed. Oxford and IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. New Delhi, Bombay, Calcutta, 345p.
Hoque, M.Z. 1984. Cropping Systems in Asia. On-Farm Research and Management. IRRI, Philippines.
Kent D. Olson. 2004. Farm Management – Principles and Strategies. Iowa State University Press
Martin, J.H. R.P. and Waldren, Stamp, D.L.. 2006. Principles of Field Crop Production 4th Ed. The McMillan Co., New York
Ronald D. Kay and William M. Edwards. Farm Management. 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2004. (Chapters 1-14)
Wolfe, T.K. and M.S. Kipps. 2004. Production of Field Crop: A Textbook of Agronomy. McGraw Hill Book Co. NewYork.

 

 

 


Course number : AGRON 4202
Course title : Crop Production and Farm Management-Practical (Compulsory)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Familiarization with the practical aspects of crop production, farm management, farm record keeping, computation of production cost, and conducting research project and writing project report is essential for an agriculture graduate. This course is therefore designed to offer practical experiences on different aspects of crop production, farm management and field experimentation and report writing.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• enable students to conduct experimental work and write project report.
• show how to lay out an agricultural farm and maintain farm records
• demonstrate crop cutting experiment and crop reporting
• explain the land use systems and crop statistics of Bangladesh
• familiarize students with the economics of crop production
• show how to prepare crop rotation, calendar and cropping scheme

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• conduct experimental work and write project report.
• lay out an agricultural farm and maintain farm records
• perform crop cutting experiment and crop reporting
• understand the land use systems and crop statistics of Bangladesh
• compute the production cost and benefit of crop cultivation
• prepare crop rotation, calendar and cropping scheme

Course Content
• Project paper: Conducting a simple experiment to study the effect of agronomic practices on crop production and to prepare a project report
• Study of farm records and their maintenance
• Preparation of cropping scheme
• Laying out an agricultural farm
• Conducting crop cutting experiment
• Preparation of a crop report
• Computation of production cost of crops included in Course No. Agron. 4201
• Preparation of crop rotation schedules
• Preparation of crop calendar
• Study of land utilization and crop statistics of Bangladesh
• Study of major cropping patterns of Bangladesh in relation to climatic parameters
Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Practice
• Demonstration

Assessment Strategy
• Written test
• Quiz
• Assignment
• Plot visit
• Presentation

Books Recommended
BBS, 2014. Statistical Yearbook of Bangladesh. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Statistics Division. Ministry of Planning. Govt. of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh.
Hedges, T.R. 1969. Farm Management Decision. Prentice Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs. London.
Hoque, M.Z. 1984. Cropping Systems in Asia. On-Farm Research and Management. IRRI, Philippines.

 

 

 

Course number : AGRON 4101
Course title : Introductory Cropping Systems – Theory (Elective)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Cropping system is an important component of a farming system. Farming system represent an appropriate combination of farm enterprises viz. cropping system, livestock, fisheries, poultry etc. and the means available to the farmer to raise them for increasing profitability. Therefore, it is important to have basic knowledge regarding site-specific cropping patterns, agro-ecosystems and cropping systems to an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to
• familiarize the students with the concept of systems, agroecosystems, cropping systems and cropping pattern
• provide knowledge regarding interactions and management practices in multiple cropping system
• to make understand the special cropping systems

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• understand the concept of systems, agro-ecosystems and cropping systems
• categorize different multiple cropping systems
• describe various kinds of special cropping systems
• discuss about different management practices in intercropping systems

Course Content
Systems: Concept and properties. Agro-ecosystems- importance, structure and function. Systems approach in agriculture- objectives and importance.
Cropping Systems: Concept and determinants. Cropping systems of Bangladesh.
Cropping Pattern: Concept, objectives. Types of multiple cropping patterns. Ecological framework for multiple cropping- diversity and productivity relationships.
Plant Interactions in Multiple Cropping Systems: Interference interactions- removal and addition interactions, mutualisms, interaction of mechanism. Factors affecting the selection of species combination- principles and practices.
Cultural Management of Crops in Intercropping Systems: Seeding environment-tillage, cultivation and weed control. Planting dates, patterns and densities. Soil fertility management- principles of fertilizer recommendation based on different cropping systems. Pest management in intercropping.
Special Cropping Systems: Rice-fish systems: alternate and simultaneous, importance and scope. Rice culture under the rice-fish systems- technology and management.

Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Question and answering
• Tutorial

Assessment Strategy
• MCQ
• Short question
• Essay type question
• Assignment

Books Recommended
Beets, C.W. 1983. Multiple Cropping and Tropical Farming Systems. Westview Press.
Francis, C.A. 1986. Multiple Cropping System. Macmillan Publishing Co. New York.
Hossain, S.M.A. 1988. Agricultural and Rural Development in Bangladesh- Evolution of Cropping Systems in Mymensingh and Comilla regions. JSARD Pub. No. 12. Japan. International Cooperation Agency, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Spedding, C.R.W. 1988. An Introduction to Agricultural Systems. (2nd Ed.). Elsevier Applied Science. London, New York.

 

 

 

Course number : AGRON 4102
Course title : Introductory Cropping Systems –Practical (Elective)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Cropping system represents cropping patterns used on a farm and their interaction with farm resources, other farm enterprises and available technology which determine their make-up. Therefore, getting practical knowledge regarding site-specific cropping patterns, agro-ecosystems and cropping systems is very much important to an agriculture graduate.

Objectives
The course is offered to
• teach the students how to analyze agro-ecosystem of an area to improve cropping systems.
• familiarize the students about the techniques of measurement of root distribution in intercropping system.
• teach the student about fertilizer dose determination in intercropping system.
• make the students understand evaluating the land equivalent ration and income equivalent ration in intercropping system.

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• analyze any agro-ecosystem regarding crop production.
• assess crop suitability in any particular agro-climatic condition.
• measure root growth and development pattern of crops in intercropping system.
• calculate fertilizer dose of different crops grown as intercrops.
• to evaluate land equivalent ration and income equivalent ratio of crops in intercropping system.

Course Content
• Agro-ecosystem analysis of any village near BAU Campus.
• Crop suitability assessment based on land and soil type.
• Canopy measurement of shoot in inter and sole crop(s).
• Study of root in intercropping pattern: root spread, pattern of distribution of roots in sole and intercrops
• Computation of LER, IER and yield equivalent in intercropping patterns.
• Analysis of resource utilization efficiency (RUE) in intercrops.
• Computation of fertilizer requirement of crops based on cropping patterns.
• A plot will be assigned to each student for growing intercrop(s) and evaluate their performance.

Teaching Strategy/ Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Illustration
• Field visit
• Assignment
• Demonstration
• Practice
• Exercise

Assessment Strategy
• MCQ
• True/False item
• Personal communication
• Exercise
• Field performance
• Written test

Books Recommended
Chatterjee, B.N., Mati, S. and Mandal, B.N. 1989. Cropping systems- Theory and Practice (2nd Ed.). Oxford and IBH Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
Zandstra, H.G., Price, L. and Morris, R.A. 1981. A Methodology for On-farm Cropping Systems Research. IRRI. Los Banos, Philippines.

 

 

 

Course number : AGRON 4203
Course title : Forage Crops and Pasture Management-Theory (Elective)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Familiarization of students on production technology of forage crops with high nutritional value and pasture management.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• give the students a context about the present conditions, challenges, and prospects of pastures and pasture crop cultivation in Bangladesh
• help the students gaining the latest production, processing, and preservation technologies of quality forage crops
• provide knowledge on planning, establishment and management of pasture

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• define and classify forage crops and pasture, and give an outline about the present scenario and prospects of forage crop cultivation and pasturing in Bangladesh
• give the ideal characteristics of a forage crop and name important forage crops
• describe climatic and soil requirements, seed rate, and nutrient, water and weed managements of forage crops
• mention the criteria for selecting a site for pasture and describe the procedure of a pasture establishment
• clarify the effect of grazing management and cultural practices on the quality of the pasture
• describe different methods of preparation and preservation of hay, straw and silage, and the factors affecting the quality of these feedstuffs during preservation

Course Content
Forage and Pasture Management: Concept, types, classification, importance, scope, relationship with agriculture. Terminology of forage and pasture science. Feasibility of pasturing in Bangladesh. Forage crops production in the existing cropping systems.
Forage Crops: Concept, classification, characteristics.
Grass-legume combination and their contribution in pasture science. Crop husbandry of grass and legume species; Grass species, Maize, sorghum, guinea grass, Para grass, napier grass, pangola and carpet grass.
Legume species: Grasspea, barseem, cowpea, clovers, Sesbania and sunnhemp.
Forage and Pasture Plant Nutrition: Concept, importance, nutrient recycling- nitrogen fixation, nitrogen cycle, legume nitrogen versus artificial nitrogen, nutrient recycling and animal movement. .
Pasture Establishment: Distribution of previous vegetation. Preparation of seed bed; time, depth and method of sowing, cover crops, pasture renovation by over drilling, seed quality, inoculation and pelleting of legume seed, management of establishing pasture.
Grazing Management- Pasture herbage quality, pasture herbage yield, influence of animals on pasture composition and yield, grazing systems and livestock performance; pasture herbage utilization.
Forage and Pasture Conservation: Hay, straw and silage – On-site conservation and effect on animal health

Teaching Strategy/Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Question and answering

Assessment Strategy
• Written test
• Quiz
• Assignment
• Presentation

Books Recommended
Holmes, W. 1987. Grass- its production and utilization. The British Grassland Society. Blackwall Scientific Publications, London.
Langer, R.H.M. 1973. Pasture and Pasture Plants. A.H. and A.W. Reed Ltd. Wellington, Sydney, London.
Pearson, C.A. and Ison, R.L. 1987. Agronomy of Grassland Systems. Cambridge University Press, New York, Sydney.
Van DerMeer. H.G., Fyden, J.C. and Ennik, G.C. 1986. Nitrogen fluxes in intensive grassland system. Nijhoff Publishers. The Netherlands.
White, J.G.H. 1989. Herbage Seed Production. Wellington, New Zealand.
Wintehead, D.C. 1970. The role of nitrogen in grassland productivity. Commonwealth. Agriculture Bureau, England.

 

 

 

Course number : AGRON 4204
Course title : Forage and Pasture Crops-Practical (Elective)
Number of credits : 2
Total Marks : 100

Rationale
Familiarization of students on production technology of forage crops with high nutritional value and pasture management.

Objectives
The course is offered to-
• introduce the students with different forage crop species.
• make the students familiar with production technology of different forage crops
• provide knowledge on how to measure the nutritional composition of forage crops.
• offer basic practical knowledge on preparation and preservation of silage, hay and straw.

Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course the students will be able to-
• identify different forage and pasture species and their seeds and propagules.
• prepare seed and plant herbarium with forage crops for future references.
• raise any forage crop with modern agronomic practices.
• prepare quality forage, hay and straw feedstuffs.
• make suitable conditions for preservation of forage, hay and straw feedstuffs.
• measure the botanical composition of a pasture.

Course Content
• Identification of different forage and pasture species
• Preparation of forage and pasture seed album
• Preparation of forage and pasture plant herbarium
• Preparation and preservation of hay
• Preparation and preservation of silage
• Preparation and preservation of straw
• Measurement of botanical composition of a pasture
• Raising a forage crop in individual plot

Teaching Strategy/ Learning Experience
• Lecture
• Demonstration
• Field visit
• Practice

Assessment Strategy
• Sample identification
• Illustration
• Exercise

Books Recommended
Holmes, W. 1987. Grass- its production and utilization. The British Grassland Society. Blackwall Scientific Publications, London.
Langer, R.H.M. 1973. Pasture and Pasture Plants. A.H. and A.W. Reed Ltd. Wellington, Sydney, London.
Pearson, C.A. and Ison, R.L. 1987. Agronomy of Grassland “Systems. Cambridge University Press, New York, Sydney.
Van DerMeer. H.G., Fyden, J.C. and Ennik, G.C. 1986. Nitrogen fluxes in intensive grassland system. Nijhoff Publishers. The Netherlands.
White, J.G.H. 1989. Herbage Seed Production. Wellington, New Zealand.
Wintehead, D.C. 1970. The role of nitrogen in grassland productivity. Commonwealth. Agriculture Bureau, England.